Aurora Project to Enable Lucid Dreaming

The Aurora project on Kickstarter got our attention this week. The device is a smart headband that plays personalized lights and sounds to help you have lucid dreams.

Lucid dreams are about more than just entertainment; they can also improve waking life. Research shows that those who lucid dream regularly experience fewer nightmares and lower levels of stress and anxiety. Visualizing activities during dreams actually improves performance of those activities in waking life. The Aurora can help you nail that upcoming presentation, hit the game-winning shot or ask your future spouse out on your first date! We spend one third of our lives asleep. Why not make the most of that time? People from all walks of life, such as Salvador Dali, Stephen King, Albert Einstein and Nikola Tesla looked to their dreams for inspiration.

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About Rich 782 Articles
Recently named as one of the Top 20 Big Data Influencers by Forbes Magazine, Rich Brueckner is an avid writer, publisher, and technology pundit focused on high performance computing. He acquired inside-HPC.com in 2010 and has since expanded his online publications to include inside-BigData, inside-Startups, and The Exascale Report. With over 25 years of HPC experience at Cray Research, SGI, and Sun Microsystems, Rich is known to many in the industry as “the guy in the Red Hat.” When he’s not working, Rich keeps busy writing fiction, cartoons, and parody films. You can check out his stories: Angels of Silence, The Observer Effect, The Three Magi of Katrina, Seven Meals from Chaos, Friends of the Fallen, The Guardian’s End, and Ghosts of the Indian Herb. He has also penned some short film scripts including: Jigsaw Falling into Place and Bardo. In non-fiction, Rich contributed the Foreword to Dark Matter, Dark Energy, Dark Gravity, a book about the Big Bang by Dr. Stephen Perrenod. He also wrote the Foreword to 72 Beautiful Galaxies, an interactive iBook by Dr. Stephen Perrenod. Rich lives and works in Portland, Oregon.

1 Comment

  1. Clearly a scam.

    The developers are claiming that their device is able to analyze brainwaves in its current state. All they have is a box with flashing lights and some photoshopped images of brainwaves on an iPhone.

    They have no amplification, no reference electrode (otherwise, all you get is noise), so many red flags.

    Ask them to post a video of the device reading and outputting some brainwaves on an iPhone, as they claim it can currently do. See what excuse they come up with.

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